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Anaerobic Vs Aerobic Composting System

In this anaerobic Vs aerobic composting system post we have briefly explained about anaerobic composting, aerobic composting, and composting areas. 

Did you know that there are different types of composting out there, too? Ventilation is needed for both aerobic composting and vermicomposting. Anaerobic composting doesn’t need oxygen to work. In order to make compost, what do you need to do first? Which one is best for you, and which one is not? Read on to learn more about anaerobic composting Vs aerobic composting system.

Aerobic Composting

Aerobic composting mimics natural breakdown by using oxygen and microbes. Aerobic composting is a procedure that can be employed with any sort of organic waste, including litter that is heavy in nitrogen. Plant materials, such as grass clippings and leaves, promote the growth of a species of bacteria that generates high temperatures of up to 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

Anaerobic Vs Aerobic Composting System

Anaerobic Vs Aerobic Composting System: Aerobic Composting. Image Source: www.trustbasket.com

Aerobic composting mimics natural breakdown by using oxygen and microbes. Aerobic composting is a procedure that can be employed with any sort of organic waste, including litter that is heavy in nitrogen. Plant materials, such as grass clippings and leaves, promote the growth of a species of bacteria that generates high temperatures of up to 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

Anaerobic Composting

Anaerobic composting is a type of waste decomposition that occurs without the use of oxygen. Anaerobic composting takes a long time and is usually done in landfills. Organic materials are piled up and naturally decompose in anaerobic composting. This technique does not require any maintenance and does not require turning. Anaerobic composting creates a considerable amount of methane and can be very odorous.

Anaerobic Vs Aerobic Composting System: Anaerobic Composting. Image Source: helpmecompost.com

Farmers have used bokashi composting for centuries since it is an anaerobic (no air) decomposing process. Traditional composting employs heat and soil bacteria to break down plant matter, but Bokashi uses beneficial microbes, or living microscopic cellular organisms. Bokashi composting is a fermentation method that takes 4-6 weeks to break down waste. It may be used both inside and outside and kills hazardous bacteria. It is a two-step procedure. The food waste is fermented first, and then the decomposition is completed by soil bacteria.

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