Biodegradable Pollutants and Non-Biodegradable Pollutants

Biodegradable Pollutants and Non-Biodegradable Pollutants

All living things need a balanced environment in order to grow, change, and reproduce. All of the things that living things need are in the environment. When the balance of the environment is upset for one reason or another, it becomes hard for living things to stay alive. This balance in the environment could be upset if harmful or unwanted things were to get into the environment.

Pollution happens when these unwanted, harmful things get into the environment. The word for this is pollution. So, pollution is any unwanted change in the environment’s physical, chemical, or biological properties that hurts people directly or indirectly through animals, plants, industrial units, or raw materials. Pollutants are the things that make the air, water, and soil dirty.

i) Biodegradable pollutants

Biodegradable pollutants are those that, over time and with the help of microorganisms like certain bacteria, can break down into simpler, harmless substances in nature. Biodegradable pollutants include garbage, urine, faeces, sewage, agricultural waste, paper, wood, cloth, cow dung, animal bones, leather, wool, and things made from plants or vegetables.

i) Non-biodegradable pollutants

Non-biodegradable pollutants are those that can’t be broken down into simpler, harmless substances in nature. Non-biodegradable pollutants include DDT, plastics, polythene, bags, insecticides, pesticides, mercury, lead, arsenic, aluminium cans, synthetic fibres, glass objects, iron products, and silver foils.

What is the Difference?

Biodegradable Pollutants and Non-Biodegradable Pollutants