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Centrioles Structure and Function with Diagram

The centriole is a cylindrical organelle made of the protein Tubulin. Let’s learn more about centrioles structure and function with diagram.

What is Centriole?

There are always two centrioles in every animal cell. When cells divide, they provide assistance. They perform their duties during the processes of mitosis and meiosis. Although they are absent from many fungi, angiosperms (flowering plants), and pinophyta, they are present in some lower plants like Chlamydomonas (conifers). When a cell isn’t dividing, you can’t see them, but they’re always present close to the nucleus.

Diagram of Centriole

Centriole Diagram

Figure 1: Structure of Centriole

Structure of Centriole

A centriole’s structure is made up of nine sets of microtubule triplets that are arranged in a cylindrical pattern. Many studies of centriole structure have required the use of a microscope to examine the tiny structures at work. The Drosophila melanogaster embryo and the C. elegans embryo defy this classification. When compared to the 9 single microtubules found in C. elegans sperm and embryos, these 9 pairs are clearly visible.

Edouard van Beneden and Theodor Boveri made the initial observations and identifications of centrioles in 1883 and 1888, respectively. In the 1950s, the structure of centriole duplication was described by Joseph G. Gall and Etienne de Harven.

The mitotic spindle and the process of cytokinesis are both aided by centrioles. They are also important in the animal cell for the formation of the mitotic spindle. Although, several recent sorts of research have explained that the cell which doesn’t have a centriole (surgically removed through laser) can function without it within the G1 level of interphase and may be formed later during a de novo manner.

Because of its ability to control where the nucleus is located within the cell, the position of the centrioles is an extremely important factor in the cell’s overall three-dimensional architecture. In flagellated and ciliated organisms the situation of such organelle is set after the mother centrioles that form the bottom.

Functions of Centriole

Even though the centrioles don’t have any DNA, they can still make new centrioles. They can change into “basal bodies.” The flagella and cilia are made in the basal bodies. By making microtubule organising centres, they help cells divide. Out of the 2 centrioles, the distal centriole forms the tail or axial filament.

FAQ

FAQs on Centrioles Structure and Function with Diagram

The centriole is in charge of the division of the cell. During the cell cycle, they help make the spindle fibres that separate the chromosomes.

A centriole is made up of a ring of nine groups of microtubules, which are hollow tubes. It seems to be in the shape of a cylinder.

Centrioles are part of how microtubules are organised in the cytoplasm. The position of the nucleus is determined by the position of the centriole, which is also in charge of how the cell is set up. So, they are essential for cells to divide.

Edouard van Beneden and Theodor Boveri made the initial observations and identifications of centrioles in 1883 and 1888, respectively. In the 1950s, the structure of centriole duplication was described by Joseph G. Gall and Etienne de Harven.

Only animal cells and a few lower plants, like Chlamydomonas, have a centriole. But none of the higher plants have them.