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Edible Oil Color Measurement

In this edible oil color measurement post we have briefly explained about principle, requirements, edible oil color measurement procedure, and results.

Edible Oil Color Measurement

Oil colour is based on the oil source; Cooking oils are typically extracted from the seeds, kernels, or mesocarp of plant fruit. The crude forms of the oils are usually refined, bleached, and deodorised before being marketed as a golden yellow liquid product, which most consumers prefer.

Cooking oils are usually extracted from the seeds, kernels, or mesocarp of the fruit of plants. The initial crude forms of the oils are usually refined, bleached, and deodorized before being marketed as a golden yellow liquid product the color preferred by most consumers,

Colour is measured by the Lovibond tintometer, usually in red and yellow terms. Most finished edible oils are less than 10 yellow and 2.5 red, with high-grade shortenings being less than 1.0 red.

Principle

The method determines the colour of oils by comparison with Lovibond glasses of known colour characteristics. The colour is expressed as the sum total of the yellow and red slides used to match the colour of the oil in a cell of the specified size in the Lovibond Tintometer.

Requirements

1. Lovibond Tintometer

2. Glass cells

Procedure

1. Melt the sample if it is not already liquid and filter the oil through a filter paper to remove any impurities and traces of moisture.

2. Make sure sample is absolutely clear and free from turbidity. Clean the glass cell of desired size with carbon tetrachloride and allow it to dry.

3. Fill it with the oil and place the cell in position in the tintometer. Match the colour with sliding red, yellow and blue colours.

Colour reading = (a Y + 5 b R) or (a Y + 10 b R) in (* cell)

Oil colour

Edible Oil Color Measurement

Where,

a = sum total of the various yellow slides (Y) used

b = sum total of the various red (R) slides used

Y + 5R is the mode of expressing the colour of light coloured oils

Y + 10 R is for the dark-coloured oils

4. Although the yellow and red slides required to match the colour shade of oil in a tintometer are assessed separately, it is found that to a certain extent these slides are mutually compensatory.

5. Consequently different workers may report different values for the yellow and red units for the same oil and the same workers may report different values for the yellow and red units for the oil examined at different times.

6. To obviate such personal errors a composite factor is used for checking the colour comprising the sum total of the yellow(Y) units and 5 or 10 times the total of red units as specified for the oil or fat.

Further Readings

Reference

  1. https://www.researchgate.net/figure/Oil-condition-based-on-color-comparisons
  2. https://sensing.konicaminolta.asia/measuring-the-color-of-oil/
  3. https://open.umn.edu/opentextbooks/textbooks/biochemistry-free-for-all-ahern