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Four Layers of Atmosphere In Order

Air is a mixture of gases that make the atmosphere. The atmosphere is the gaseous mass or envelope surrounding a celestial body, especially the one surrounding the Earth and retained by the celestial body’s gravitational field. Let’s learn more about four layers of atmosphere. Lets learn more about Four Layers of Atmosphere In Order.

The atmosphere is most dense at the surface of the Earth because gravity pulls the molecules of gas toward the center of the Earth. The atmosphere is divided into four general layers: troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere (Figure 1: picture of layers of atmosphere).

Four Layers of Atmosphere In Order

Figure 1: Picture of layers of atmosphere explains the Four Layers of Atmosphere In Order.

Troposphere

More than 80 percent of the mass of the Earth’s atmosphere and virtually all of the water vapour, clouds and precipitation occur in the troposphere. In the four layers of atmosphere the troposphere extends from the Earth’s surface to an altitude that varies from 8 to 18 km depending on latitude and season. At the poles, the troposphere may extend up to about 8 km, while at the equator it is about 18 km. In the troposphere, temperature typically decreases with altitude by an average of about 6.5°C km-1 (called the lapse rate). The top of the troposphere is called the tropopause which forms the boundary between the troposphere and the stratosphere.

Picture of Troposphere

Figure 1: Picture of Troposphere.

Stratosphere

This 2nd layer of four layers of atmosphere starts from tropopause and goes up to 50 km. A thin ozone layer is present at the height of 15 to 30 km. The troposphere and stratosphere together account for about 99.9 percent of the mass of the atmosphere. Collectively, the troposhere and the stratosphere are known as lower atmosphere. The top of the stratosphere is called the stratopause which forms the boundary between the stratosphere and the mesosphere.

Picture of Stratosphere

Figure 1: Picture of Stratosphere.

Mesosphere

This layer starts from about 50 km above the Earth’s surface and goes up to 85 km. The boundary between the mesosphere and the thermosphere (a layer above mesosphere) is called the mesopause. As we move up in the mesosphere, the temperature gets colder. The top of the mesosphere is the coldest part of Earth’s atmosphere (the temperature is around -90°C).

Picture of Mesosphere

Figure 1: Picture of Mesosphere.

Thermosphere

Last layer of the four layers of atmosphere extends from about 85 km to about 600 km in the atmosphere. Within the thermosphere, temperature rises continually and goes beyond 1000°C. Within the thermosphere, there is a relatively dense band of charged particles called the ionosphere. The outermost layer of our atmosphere is exosphere. It extends from the top of the thermosphere up to 10,000 km. The boundary between thermosphere and exosphere is called the thermopause.

Picture of Thermosphere

Figure 1: Picture of Thermosphere.

FAQ

FAQs on Four Layers of Atmosphere In Order

There are five primary layers and a number of subsidiary layers that make up Earth’s atmosphere. The principal layers are the troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere, thermosphere, and exosphere, from the lowest to the highest.

The troposphere is where you’ll find the vast majority of aero planes. It rises to an altitude of about 11 kilometers.

The stratosphere is a part of the atmosphere of the earth. As we go higher, this is the second layer of air. The air in the stratosphere is very dry because it has very little water vapour in it. Because of this, there are no clouds in the stratosphere.

There are five primary layers and a number of subsidiary layers that make up Earth’s atmosphere. The principal layers are as follows: troposphere; stratosphere; mesosphere; thermosphere; and exosphere.

The stratosphere, which starts at about 10-16 kilometres (6-10 miles) above the Earth’s surface and extends up to about 50 kilo- metres (31 miles) altitude, contains the vast majority of the Earth’s ozone (about 90%). The term “ozone layer” is used to refer to the region of the stratosphere where ozone concentrations are maximum.

Troposphere. Almost all meteorological phenomena take place in the lower atmosphere. The troposphere spans from the surface of the Earth up to an altitude of about 12 miles (20 kilometres).

Lower Atmosphere; Troposphere. Where we actually exist, the atmosphere’s lowest levels. Clouds, precipitation, and snowfall all make up a large part of our climate.