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Simple Microscope Parts and Functions

Have you ever wished you could examine something up close but lacked a powerful microscope? Perhaps all you need is a magnifying glass, hand lens, or simple microscope. To observe finer details than the naked eye can capture, these simple tools magnify objects using a single lens. In this post, we’ll read about simple light microscope and simple microscope drawing.

Definition of Simple Microscope

The term “simple microscope” refers to devices that use only one lens to magnify an item by a great amount using only angular magnification, creating a vertically elongated virtual image for the viewer.

Magnifying glasses, loupes, and eyepieces are just a few of the lenses that may be used with these microscopes to increase the magnification factor. A Simple Microscope is a type of optical or light microscope.

This is the very first microscope that has ever been constructed. In the 17th century, Antony van Leeuwenhoek was the one who came up with the idea. He incorporated a convex lens and a specimen holder into a single device.

Principle of Simple Microscope

The idea behind a simple microscope is based on the way lenses bend light. Light is refracted, or bent, when it passes through a lens. How much refraction happens depends on the shape and material of the lens. A lens that is thicker in the middle than on the edges is called a converging lens because it makes light rays come together at a point.

The lens used in a simple microscope is converging lens to focus light on the object being looked at and make it look bigger. When the object is put in front of the lens, the light rays from the object are bent by the lens and focused at a point called the focal point. When the image forms at the focal point, the lens makes it bigger. Then, you can look through the lens to see the magnified image.

Working of Simple Microscope

The lens used in a simple microscope is convex lens with a relatively low focal length can serve as the basis for a basic microscope.

working of simple microscope

Figure 1: Working of Simple Microscope

Lens used in simple microscope are a convex lens with a relatively low focal length can serve as the basis for a basic microscope. The lens’ focal length is denoted by F. Between the focal length and the center of curvature, an object is positioned. A light ray emerging from the item (source) passes through the lens’s center of curvature (Simple microscope labeled image 1).

Another light ray goes through the lens’s focus, which is on the other side of the lens on the principal axis. As can be seen in Figure, both light beams reach the eye, and the image is generated by following the rays in reverse. The resultant image will be generated at the place where the rays intersect. The finished image is virtual, upright, and enhanced. Consequently, a convex lens serves as a Simple microscope.

Magnification of Simple Microscope

The magnification of simple microscope is given by:

M = 1 + D/F

Where, D = the least distance of distinct vision. F = focal length of the convex lens. The lens’s ability to magnify will be stronger if its focal length is shorter. This microscope has a maximum magnification power of 10. This means that at maximum magnification, the object will look 10 times bigger than it really is.

Parts of Simple Microscope

simple microscope drawing

Figure 2: Simple Microscope Drawing

A simple microscope consists of a few basic parts:

Lenses: The lens is the microscope’s primary component and is used to magnify the image. Typical simple microscopes contain a single lens fixed to a frame or handle. Lens used in simple microscope are convex lenses.

Handle: The frame or handle holds the lens and provides a means for the user to position and hold the simple light microscope.

The base: The base is the bottom component of a microscope and offers a secure surface for the instrument to rest on (Figure 1: simple microscope labeled).

Stage: The simple light microscope stage is the flat platform onto which the viewing object is placed in simple light microscope.

Light: Some basic microscopes include an illumination source, such as a light bulb or LED, to illuminate the item being observed.

Eyepiece: The eyepiece is the component of the simple light microscope through which the user views the magnified image.

Focusing knob: The focusing knob on some simple microscopes allows the user to modify the focus of the image by moving the lens closer to or further from the item being seen.

Uses of Simple Microscope

Here are the application of simple microscope,

Examining Samples: You can use a simple light microscope to look at small samples like cells, tissues, or small organisms in simple light microscope.

Observing plants: Simple light microscope can be used to look at the structure of plant cells and tissues, such as the walls of the cells and the organelles inside the cells.

Viewing Microbes: Microorganisms, like bacteria or fungi, can be looked at with simple microscopes to learn about their structure and characteristics.

Examining anatomy: Simple microscopes can be used to study the structure and functions of small animals like insects by looking at their anatomy.

Science education: Simple light microscope are often used in biology classes to teach students about microscopy and how living things are put together and how they work.

FAQ

FAQs on Simple Microscope

A simple microscope is a type of microscope that magnifies objects using a single lens. It is also known as a hand lens or magnifying glass.

Giovanni di Conforto is thought to have invented the first basic microscope in the early 14th century. 1335’s “Theorica Planetarum” by Di Conforto describes a primitive microscope.

Leonard Digges and Zacharias Janssen invented primitive microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries. Early basic microscopes were used to read small print, examine small objects, and study living organisms. Simple microscopes are used for these and other applications today.

Giovanni di Conforto is thought to have invented the first basic microscope in the early 14th century. 1335’s “Theorica Planetarum” by Di Conforto describes a primitive microscope.

Leonard Digges and Zacharias Janssen invented primitive microscopes in the 16th and 17th centuries. Early basic microscopes were used to read small print, examine small objects, and study living organisms. Simple microscopes are used for these and other applications today.

Draw the microscope’s base horizontally.

From the base’s center, draw a vertical line. The microscope’s body.

Add a small rectangle to the body to symbolize the stage.

Draw a lens near the head.

For the eyepiece, draw a horizontal line from the lens.

Below the lens, draw a little square to represent the focusing knob.

As desired, add a handle or light source.

  1. Cut a piece of cardboard to fit the magnifying glass or lens.
  2. Attach the lens to the cardboard.
  3. Cut a small hole in the lens’s center for viewing.
  4. Tape a torch or LED light behind the lens if desired.
  5. Place the object on a flat surface, such as a table, and focus the handmade microscope lens on it.
  6. View the magnified image via the lens hole.